Racism Receipts
strugglingtobeheard:

isfahaneyes:

Just in case you didn’t know where it came from.
That’s Right racially oblivious scene kids
It came from us.


I hate scene kids because they think they own and invented these looks and call ppl poseurs when they are literally 1000s of years behind lol

strugglingtobeheard:

isfahaneyes:

Just in case you didn’t know where it came from.

That’s Right racially oblivious scene kids

It came from us.

I hate scene kids because they think they own and invented these looks and call ppl poseurs when they are literally 1000s of years behind lol

Stop rawing ok precum is real and u will catch an std or get pregnant and die

jackpowerx:

doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.

Really, @mentalflossr? Really?

lilbijou:

s1uts:

lilsucia:

petitedeath:

munnarita:

reverseracism:

Quoted from www.nydailynews.com:

She may be a living doll, but she doesn’t have a pretty mouth.

Valeria Lukyanova, the Ukranian woman dubbed “Human Barbie” because of her multiple plastic surgeries, shared her thoughts on race and beauty in a new interview with GQ Magazine — implying that the push for plastic surgery procedures in the Western world is “because of the race-mixing.”

"Ethnicities are mixing now, so there’s degeneration, and it didn’t used to be like that," said Lukyanova, according to GQ.

"Remember how many beautiful women there were in the 1950s and 1960s, without any surgery? And now, thanks to degeneration, we have this."

"I love the Nordic image myself," continued Lukyanova, whose age has been reported as 38. "I have white skin; I am a Nordic type - perhaps a little Eastern Baltic, but closer to Nordic."

The conversation shocked her interviewer, GQ Russia editor Michael Idov, who dubbed his subject “a racist space alien.”

(Via nydailynews)

This is not the first time Ms. Lukyanova had been publicly caught referring to her ignorant ideals. Not only is she against racial mixing, she is also a firm believer in Hitler’s Nazi ideologies, anti-semitism, the super Aryan race, and racial segregation. She does not believe in helping the less fortunate and feels “uncomfortable” around those with disabilities. She is against feminism and believes in traditional strict gender roles blaming POC, the LGBTQA community, and the multiple civil rights movements for the demise of social order. From the pictures above we can see she is wearing a bindi, she does participate in cultural appropriation. Upon searching her name you will come across various images of her dawning southern Asian attire while simultaneously mocking the culture.

She has been quoted stating: “I only dislike an appearence of niggers, arabs etc. But I’m not a racist. I’m just an esthete.”

A quick google search will tell you all you need to know on her belief system. She is not shy when it comes to sharing her racist/ignorant opinions.

- Susie the moderator


this woman is gross in like all the ways one can be gross.

jesus christ

She’s a white supremacist like
She’s been a white supremacist

she is so ugly

Can talk stop stanning for her now

sibyllinesketchblog:

♥ S p r i n g ♥

so what's the appropriate terms to use instead of 'oriental'? and why is 'oriental' considered as racist and offensive? I thought it was a common term since it's widely used

thisisnotjapan:

From Ellen Oh- 

Please don’t call me Oriental

The other day an old man made a comment to me that my oriental children were well mannered. I said thank you and tried not to let the oriental comment bother me. After all, he is from a different generation where oriental was the correct term to use for Asians. But it got me to thinking about the word and why it bothered me and I started doing some research and stumbled upon a forum with over 10 pages of back and forth on why it was insulting or why it was ridiculous. And the one comment that really upset me was when someone said “Oriental offensive? Since when did we let foreigners dictate how to use our language?”

It is a telling comment. Its roots based in the notion that Asians are foreigners. The term “oriental” comes from the “orient” which refers to the east. A term that was based on the Eurocentric belief that the Orient was a barbaric and exotic place east of Europe. It is why the word itself is considered derogatory, for it casts “orientals” as different, as foreigners. And when you think of yourself as American, being reminded that you are “foreign” hurts.

When I first started having conversations about race with my children, they would ask me if they should tell people they are Korean. I said no, you say you are American. “But I can’t say that,” my then 6 year old said. “They say I don’t look American.” I think as a parent, there are moments that just break your heart because you want to protect your children from the harsh realities of life and you find that you just can’t.

The reality is that my kids, me, my sister, my husband - we are as far from being Korean as we are from being Egyptian or Russian. We might look like a Korean and pass for one on the streets of Seoul, but as soon as we open our mouths, our Americanism pours right out. Not just in what we say or how we say it. But in how we think, walk, laugh, carry ourselves, etc. For someone to say “You’re not American because you don’t look like one.” Well then, you might as well strip us of our complete identity. It’s like every time someone shouts out “Go back to your own country!” Something inside of us dies just a little bit.

This past spring, youngest came home from kindergarten deeply upset. When I asked her what was wrong, she explained that she was sitting at lunch with 2 of her friends H and M, who are both blond and blue-eyed. Two boys were sitting across from them and were commenting on how pretty H and M are, listing how pretty their eyes were and their long hair, etc. They then turned to youngest and began to comment on how ugly she was in comparison. Youngest was devastated. I was proud of her for standing up to them. Telling them to stop or she would move to another table. When they didn’t stop, she made good on her threat and moved away. I was proud of her for taking a stand, but my heart broke for her. She asked me if she really was ugly because she didn’t have blonde hair and blue eyes. “No,” I said, “you are beautiful inside and out but some people just are blind and can’t see a diamond shining so bright in front of them. But that’s ok. It’s their loss so don’t even waste your time thinking about them.”

Even in kindergarten, children learn to recognize differences and to comment on them. While I did call the school and had the teacher have the boys apologize to youngest, can we really blame children for deep rooted societal prejudices? They told youngest she was ugly because she was different. Her eyes were different, her cheeks were different, even the one asymmetric dimple she has was different. I told her different is good. I hope she remembers that and never lets this become insecurity.

Many people complain that we’ve become so PC that we can’t say anything for fear of someone getting offended. To some extent, I agree with that and I don’t ask for people to be so careful with their words. But ultimately it isn’t the words that hurt but the intent behind them and sometimes the words themselves become synonymous with the intent. Calling someone oriental or making chinky eyes might not have been made with a racist intent, but the word and the action have become synonymous with an intent to be racist. So why use them? Yes we are different and I truly believe different is good. But when these differences are used as a way to stereotype people negatively, it becomes racism.

So please, don’t call me oriental. I am no devious, slant-eyed, exotic foreigner that speaks cryptically of ancient Chinese secrets. That stereotype needs to die. Help me kill it once and for all.

eugene-victor-tooms:

tough-grrrl:

princessskittybot:

cishet people be like NOOO U CANT USE THAT TERM TO DESCRIBE UR SEXUALITY/GENDER ITS MADE UP WORD!!! and then turn around and make up ridiculous terms like mancrush and guyliner and man-purse in order to keep their precious hetronormitive gender roles intact

"bromance"

this is an extremely important post

alchemyjones:

I was in no mood.

YAAAS!!!!

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

lastrealindians:

Native Appropriation Soup: Pac Sun, Harry Styles and Ralph Lauren Latest Offenders, By Danielle Miller

Our cultures have been the scapegoat for colonizers to feel exotic and rebellious since days of the Boston Tea party. When we challenge appropriation we are challenging the privileged colonizer identity which has been upheld since the origins of America. One of the modern depictions of erasure is the Native skull aesthetic. I already went into ways these pictures are problematic in past articles about Kanye West. To sum it up, an image which celebrates genocide is never acceptable.

The use of cultural symbols for profit with no involvement with the communities is an act of exploitation. These celebrities and corporations won’t touch any Native issues with a fifty foot pole but they will put on a Native headdress in a heartbeat.

These acts of appropriation don’t simply boil down to unoriginality or aesthetic choices. That becomes evident when you see certain historical policies or interactions of the United States and Native communities reflected within clothing designs. One flagrant example of this was when Gap came out with “Manifest Destiny” shirts. When the company received complaints the designer Mark McNairy even had the nerve to tweet “MANIFEST DESTINY. SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST”. While he may have thought his assertion of conquest was clever he sure was quick to apologize when there was large outcry. (He was hurt for the wrong reasons, because of the fact his feelings were hurt over being called racist). That’s just one example of white supremacy showing.

Sexualizing native women is also another dynamic of conquest. Pac sun sold Yeezus shirts and has now taken things a step further by selling shirts with a sexualized Native woman (from the brand Riot society).

Complete with all the typical pan-Indian type sentiments the shirt depicts a woman with a headdress and war paint and is even labeled “Tribal girl tank top”. The shirt also comes up after the search term “Aztec”. This same model was also used on another shirt; the war paint was photo shopped onto the image. (Brownie points for originality!) When Natives on twitter left negative reviews on the website it seemed that the reviews were just deleted. Pac Sun’s twitter also gave native twitter users no response.

The most recent attempt was a collection by Ralph Lauren which pictures the typical skull and headdress. Most alarming for me was a tee shirt picturing a Native man in regalia with an eagle over his shoulder, a banner with the words “sacred hills” going across. This design is potentially symbolic America’s presence and ownership over the black hills. Its common knowledge that the United States stole land from natives; but many of the general public isn’t even aware that the Black Hills was promised to the Lakota in the Ft. Laramie treaty of 1868.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/native-appropriation-soup-pac-sun-harry-styles-and-ralph-lauren-latest-offenders-by-danielle-miller/