Racism Receipts

whiteguiltconfessionals:

sweetheartpleasestay:

dynastylnoire:

trikkirikki:

-imaginarythoughts-:

poeticallybrown:

olitzme-or-nah:

geejayeff:

So the NAACP tried it. Coming into the #MikeBrown tag with some text book deflection and black folk blaming. But twitter was NOT having it

Bless social media because the NAACP’s okey doke is just the kind of soothing pablum the main stream media laps up. But…

Koch brothers must’ve donated again.

wow. just… wow.

So basically they’re blaming black folk and saying black people don’t do anything to prove their valuable.

I get it even more now, they are the Negros Always Asking Caucasian Permission. The NAACP is just another tool of the man. They ain’t revolutionary, they basic. 

The NAACP receives funding from rich white people. I’m sure, based upon the money they have individually at this point, new blackness has spread amongst them. This is peak level new blackness.

Have y’all never even read the history of the NAACP?

The NAACP was formed partly in response to the continuing horrific practice of lynching and the 1908 race riot in Springfield, the capital of Illinois and resting place of President Abraham Lincoln. Appalled at the violence that was committed against blacks, a group of white liberals that included Mary White Ovington and Oswald Garrison Villard, both the descendants of abolitionists, William English Walling and Dr. Henry Moscowitz issued a call for a meeting to discuss racial justice. Some 60 people, seven of whom were African American (including W. E. B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Mary Church Terrell), signed the call, which was released on the centennial of Lincoln’s birth.

It was created by White people, period. Only 7 of 60 respondents were Black. Seven.The idea itself came from White people and that will always guide its principles because it has always been a matter of being palatable to White politics and White American culture. The NAACP is not for us and will never be for us because it was not made byus.

This is exactly why I want to start an organization myself once I’m in / done with law school and have some capital to get some programs started. Tired of waiting on old ass irrelevant people with backwards ass mindsets to do something that will change mylife and my experience because they’re “past” it. I can’t get “past” the idea that my brother could be shot dead for literally no reason other than some bully with a gun didn’t like him.

They don’t care shit about us because we aren’t the ones cutting those checks. The NAACP is not for us.

We can start that program now! With my idea I’ve been talking about -M

alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York
As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.  A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.
Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.
This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.
In this last year I have been thinking about some things….
I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.
I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.
I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.
I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.
I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.
I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.
I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.
I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.
Who the fuck are you people?
There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York

As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.

A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.

Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.

This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.

In this last year I have been thinking about some things….

I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.

I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.

I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.

I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.

I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.

I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.

I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.

I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.

Who the fuck are you people?

There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

Why do black people straighten their hair if non-black people can't get corn row/ box braid/ whatever you consider a "black" hairstyle

dynastylnoire:

lordbape:

why do white people always try to make this non-point false equivalence when they know these are two completely different realities that don’t compare on any plane whatsoever

white people not only make black people hate their hair at an individual emotional level but literally at a systemic level in which black people are and have been for the last century unable to get jobs, attend colleges, enlist in the armed forces, etc. because of the treatment of their natural hair. there literally is nothing white people have to compare…

white people are not getting box braids because they feel pressured to, or out of fear that they won’t have access to a job or anything, but instead because they know it’s an “edgy black people thing” that they’re doing to be counter culture and subversive. there is literally no pressure on earth for anyone INCLUDING BLACK PEOPLE to worship or utilize Black hairstyles or Black hair in its natural state and you fucking know it. It’s literally the complete opposite for white hair. grow up

white people are not gelling down baby hairs for social mobility or financial security or comfort or assimilation.

credit to black—lamb

  • image
  • gradientlair:

    12 year old Vanessa VanDyke is being threatened with expulsion from Faith Christian Academy in Orlando unless she cuts her natural hair.

  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image

Read the ads

"MEN WHO GO PLACES" "WAS IT HER RESUME OR HER RELAXER?" white people don’t have ads telling them "you will not be successful in life unless you have cornrows and box braids with gelled down baby hairs" because that isn’t the case. address this in the context of reality, maybe???

your supplemental facts of the day

alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York
As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.  A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.
Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.
This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.
In this last year I have been thinking about some things….
I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.
I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.
I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.
I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.
I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.
I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.
I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.
I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.
Who the fuck are you people?
There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York

As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.

A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.

Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.

This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.

In this last year I have been thinking about some things….

I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.

I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.

I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.

I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.

I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.

I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.

I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.

I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.

Who the fuck are you people?

There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims

1Criminalizing Blackness in America

2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares

3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death

4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)

5. Lauren Davidson: Disturbing Study Proves That Cops View Black Children Differently 

This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in »Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe

thelingerieaddict:

divascreech:

jcoleknowsbest:

wakeupslaves:

Racist white Teacher Suspended for Punching 5-Year-Old Girl in the Face
 A racist teacher at Sheffield Elementary School in Memphis, Tennessee has been suspended after being accused of punching a 5-year-old girl. The teacher, whom theschool district refuses to name, has not beenarrested, but an investigation by the MemphisPolice Department has begun.
Tiffany McConnell told WMC Action News 5 that she questioned her daughter, Payden, when she woke up one morning with a black eye after noticing puffiness the evening before. “I asked her what happened. She told me her teacher pushed her down and punched her, and I was devastated.”
Payden began kindergarten last week, and McConnell says the transition was difficult for her daughter. She told Fox Memphis, “My daughter said she was crying and screaming because she wanted to come home with me, and the teacher got mad because she wanted to go to the restroom again…and pushed her down and punched her.” She says the school’s principal told her another child also witnessed the incident.
McConnell will home school her daughter for the rest of the year. “My child is afraid to go back around theschool,” she explained.
The district plans to follow up with the allegations. Shelby County Schools said in a statement, “The District is investigating these allegations, and the teacher has been suspended pending the outcome of the investigation.”
These occurrences serve as reminders that we must listen to our black kids and know what’s going in their please white racist controlled classrooms. 

This happened right down the street from my house.. I would be in jail.. Jail.. jail.. jail.. Peep how the school board refuses to name the teacher…

LITERALLY WHAT THE FUCK

What?

thelingerieaddict:

divascreech:

jcoleknowsbest:

wakeupslaves:

Racist white Teacher Suspended for Punching 5-Year-Old Girl in the Face


A racist teacher at Sheffield Elementary School in Memphis, Tennessee has been suspended after being accused of punching a 5-year-old girl. The teacher, whom theschool district refuses to name, has not beenarrested, but an investigation by the MemphisPolice Department has begun.

Tiffany McConnell told WMC Action News 5 that she questioned her daughter, Payden, when she woke up one morning with a black eye after noticing puffiness the evening before. “I asked her what happened. She told me her teacher pushed her down and punched her, and I was devastated.”

Payden began kindergarten last week, and McConnell says the transition was difficult for her daughter. She told Fox Memphis, “My daughter said she was crying and screaming because she wanted to come home with me, and the teacher got mad because she wanted to go to the restroom again…and pushed her down and punched her.” She says the school’s principal told her another child also witnessed the incident.

McConnell will home school her daughter for the rest of the year. “My child is afraid to go back around theschool,” she explained.

The district plans to follow up with the allegations. Shelby County Schools said in a statement, “The District is investigating these allegations, and the teacher has been suspended pending the outcome of the investigation.”

These occurrences serve as reminders that we must listen to our black kids and know what’s going in their please white racist controlled classrooms. 

This happened right down the street from my house.. I would be in jail.. Jail.. jail.. jail.. Peep how the school board refuses to name the teacher…

LITERALLY WHAT THE FUCK

What?

"racism is a disease of white ppl" lol well that's not racist at all.

afro-dominicano:

it’s not racist it’s facts lol. white people invented racism and subsequently  a system and institution for it based on their violent superiority/inferiority complexes that lead to their antiblackness which spread out to the rest of the world.

if you wanna collect me for saying that you might as well check ya boy einstein cause he had something similar to say. he racist too doe right?

softcore-fuckery:

makingofamelody:

makingofamelody:

1. Eric Garner executed on July 17th, 2014. Put in illegal choke hold and strangled by the NYPD

2. Pregnant lady gets put in an illegal chokehold by an NYPD officer for “illegally grilling” while her seven year old daughter watches July 27th, 2014

3. NYPD enters wrong house and drags a naked woman across the floor, then pepper sprays her four year old grandson August 2nd, 2014.

4. Man shot and killed by police for holding a toy gun in a Walmart, Dayton, Ohio - August 6th, 2014

5. Unarmed Black teen shot ten times by the Ferguson Police while walking home with his friend from the convenience store - August 9th, 2014

Since July 17th there has been five reported occurrences exemplifying the police and American justice system’s lack of reverence for Black life. These are the five stories that were able to attract at least minimal attention. Who knows what is going on out there covered up (like the Ferguson police is trying to do with Mike Brown’s murder), unrecorded, and unknown. In the past 23 days the police have perpetrated the humiliation, degradation, and murdering of Black dignity,souls, and people. Knowledge is power. Do not rely on mainstream media to give you the full/accurate story. They will always be complicit in the devaluing of Black life because Blackness has been criminalized in America. Please spread these stories and add any more that you know of under the hashtag #badges are the new hoods. We need to start documenting, and spreading information. They will try to silence us as they did to Ramsey Orta, and Alba Lekaj, the people who filmed the NYPD harasing and murdering Eric Garner. But united we can make a difference.  Knowledge is power. Stay woke Black America, Stay woke.

this happened in the past 23 days

frank-e-shadow-tongue:

TW: Terrorism, Genocide, Colonization

strugglingtobeheard:

Banished vividly recovers the too-quickly forgotten history of racial cleansing in America when thousands of African Americans were driven from their homes and communities by violent, racist mobs. The film places these events in the context of present day race relations by following three concrete cases where black and white citizens warily explore if there is common ground for reconciliation over these expulsions. Banished raises this larger question: will the United States ever make meaningful reparations for the human rights abuses suffered, then and now, against its African American citizens? Can reconciliation between the races be possible without them? 

Between 1860 and 1920 hundreds of U.S. counties expelled their black residents. The pattern was depressingly similar in almost all cases. The counties tended to have small, defenseless black populations. A black man was rumored to have assaulted a white woman, was lynched and then white rioters attacked black neighborhoods with guns and firebombs. Few black property owners had time to sell their properties nor dared return to repossess them. Whites could then illegally assume ownership of them. African Americans not only lost their hard-won homes, farms and businesses, but saw their communities and families dispersed and their very right to exist violated. The film reveals that even one hundred years later, these racially cleansed communities tend to remain all-white bastions of separatism, sometimes harboring active klaverns of the Ku Klux Klan. Another California Newsreel release, Trouble Behind documents the same process in Corbin, Kentucky, home of Kentucky Fried Chicken. 

Banished presents a fascinating detective story through yellowed newspaper archives, registries of deeds, photos from treasured family albums and dimly recalled stories of grandparents and great-grandparents who lived through these traumatic events to reconstruct a dramatic record of the expulsions. The film features black families determined to go to any length to reconstruct their families’ past and gain some justice for their ancestors and themselves. It interviews dedicated local journalists, who braved community opposition, to research the banishments in-depth and force their readers to confront their towns’ past and present. Banished was itself co-produced by award-winning documentary filmmaker Marco Williams and the Center for Investigative Reporting, widely respected for its in-depth, uncompromising coverage of social justice issues. 

Banished first visits Forsyth County, Georgia, now a prosperous suburban sprawl north of Atlanta. In 1912, African Americans were violently driven out; today there is still a saying among black folk: “Don’t let the sun go down on you in Forsyth County.” In 1987 a bi-racial Martin Luther King Celebration tour was organized through the all-white county. Buses filled with marchers were met by angry mobs, led by seven white supremacist groups and a melee ensued. The governor set up a commission to investigate the incident and to respond to black calls that the stolen land be returned to them. We meet the Strickland family as they return to the 2000 acres once owned by their great grandfather and they restore the neglected family burial ground as a “monument to the past.” Although the commission found no deeds for the passage of land from half of the expelled black owners to whites, the white members denied that their community was responsible for any recompense and that statute of limitations had run out for any claims against illegal occupation. The Stricklands were denied not only their land but even the closure that the acknowledgement of past injustices might have given them.

The small, peaceful town of Pierce City, Missouri, banished its African American population in1901; it is still all-white. In 2006, a descendant of one of the expelled families, Charles Brown, decided to exhume the body of his great-grandfather buried in Pierce City and inter it in the family plot in Springfield. He met bureaucratic stone-walling and what emerged as a pattern of denial and avoidance on the part of whites. But the soft-spoken, reasonable Brown persisted and finally convinced the local coroner and a former mayor to help him rebury his ancestor. But when he unexpectedly asked Pierce City to pay the bill as a token of regret for the banishment, the whites felt betrayed, the victims of a “bait and switch.” They offered a transparently hypocritical response: the crimes of 1901 were so horrific that no dollar amount could ever compensate, only trivialize them. Sherrilyn Ifill, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland, stresses that reparations are a continuing process, providing recompense whenever and however it becomes possible. 

Finally, Banished travels to Harrison, Arkansas, a small city where a faith-based process for “truth and reconciliation” was initiated, perhaps inspired by the South African example. In 1909, a white mob lynched a black man and then expelled the town’s black citizens. It is still all-white, a Klan stronghold with the Confederate flag flying over the Chamber of Commerce and a refuge for retirees who “who want to live without black people.” A Taskforce for Race Relations was formed to deal with this situation in a “substantive” way. It established two college scholarships for black students to attract them to the local schools, named after Aunt Vine, a maid, who was the only black person allowed to remain in Harrison after 1901. But one of the scholarship recipients observes that Harrison is still a “sundown town;” “black people won’t spend the night in Harrison.” The Taskforce hired a consultant, David Zimmerman, a local historian, who suggested they erect a monument in the city square acknowledging that nearby there once was a flourishing African American community which was destroyed by a white mob. This would provide a public space for acknowledgement, healing and reconciliation but even this modest plan was met with objections.

Banished is as much a film about forgetting as remembering. In its understated way, it allows its white subjects to reveal a collective repression of their communities’ racial history through selective memory, outright denial and rationalization. While African Americans seem compelled to remember, confront and redress the crimes of racism, many whites want to ignore them, not only to reject any responsibility for them but, more importantly, any responsibility for rectifying them. They do not seem to recognize that a free conscience can begin only with remorse. The theft of property, wealth, community and hope must at least be admitted and repaired to whatever extent practical. Racial cleansing is still rampant in the U.S., it just takes more subtle forms: red-lining, redevelopment, gentrification, gated communities, all-white suburbs, the Katrina Diaspora. This powerful but not rhetorical film makes evident that any reconciliation, any honest healing between the races, will only be possible once denial, the willful banishing of our racial past, has itself been banished. 

Because it is both a scrupulously researched history film and a probing study of the process of racial reconciliation, Banished is a valuable resource for teaching American History, the Jim Crow era, race relations, cultural competency, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution, and restorative justice as well as journalistic ethics. 

Black Americans have always lived in war zones or soon to be war zones.